Burn MD

Welcome to the Leading Authority on Emergency Burn Care
and Household Burn Safety.

WATER-JEL Product Monograph

This 16-page summary contains key findings from studies of Water-Jel, as well as information from published articles about the products.

Click here to download the PDF

Consumer Products

Burn-Jel Plus for Emergency Burn Care

Every 25 seconds, someone is burned or scalded in their home. Are you prepared?

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Professional Products

Water-Jel fire blankets and wraps in pouches and canisters

Be prepared for burn injuries—large and small.

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BURN MD FAQs

  1. What causes most burns?
  2. How severe does a burn have to be to warrant immediate medical attention?
  3. What is the most effective emergency first aid burn care treatment?
  4. What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of THERMAL BURNS?
  5. What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of ELECTRICAL BURNS and recommendations regarding NFPA 70 ARC FLASH?
  6. What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of CHEMICAL BURNS?
  7. What shouldn’t I put on a burn?
  8. Where do burn injuries occur?
  9. How can I prevent burn injuries in my home?
  10. How can I help keep my family safe from burns when grilling in the yard?
  11. What are the burn safety guidelines for camping with the family?
  12. How can I prevent burn damage from heated hairstyling appliances?
  13. How can I prevent burn accidents when cooking with my children?

 

What causes most burns?

Experts classify burns into three major types, depending on their cause:

Thermal—Burns caused by flame, steam, hot liquid or hot metal.

Electrical—Burns caused by direct contact with electrical current, or the passing of electrical current through the body, including lightning.

Chemical—Burns caused by direct bodily contact with acids, lye, strong detergents or chemicals, or by inhalation of chemical fumes.

Each kind of burn has unique characteristics, and as a result, appropriate first aid may vary.

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How severe does a burn have to be to warrant immediate medical attention?

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention. Be sure to elevate the burned extremity above the level of the heart while waiting for medical attention.

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What is the most effective emergency first aid burn care treatment?

Water-Jel is the leading brand of emergency first aid for burns.

Water-Jel is a water-based, water-soluble gel that draws the heat out of a burn while it relieves the pain, cools the skin and protects against airborne contamination. By applying Water-Jel as soon as possible, the heat of the burn is dissipated, helping to prevent the heat from progressing deeper into the skin. The gel consists of 96% water and has the same cooling effects as water, but because it is thick, it stays on the burn. Water-Jel also contains a small amount of the natural extract Melaleuca alternifolia, better known as Tea Tree Oil. This has natural antibacterial properties, helping prevent infection. Water-Jel also contains thickening agents and preservatives to maintain the gel’s viscosity and efficacy and give it a five-year shelf life from date of manufacture.

Water-Jel is available in sterile Burn Dressings, Fire Blankets, Burn Wraps, Face Masks, Topical Cooling Gels and a unique topical gel specifically for sunburns.

For more information on Water-Jel, click here.

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What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of THERMAL BURNS?

Thermal burns are caused by flame, steam, hot liquid or hot metal. When a thermal burn occurs, seconds count!

  1. Immediately move the victim from the source of the burn. If the victim’s clothing is still on fire, prevent the burn victim from running, which will only fan the flames. However, standing still makes the ignition of hair and inhalation of flames more likely. Instead, instruct the victim to stop, drop to the ground and roll to extinguish the flames.
  2. Spray the victim with water or wrap him or her in a blanket, heavy coat or rug to smother any residual flames—or place a Water-Jel Fire Blanket on him or her to extinguish the flames. The U.S. Military uses this method.
  3. If the flames were caused by a flammable liquid, like gasoline, make sure the burned individual avoids further exposure to heat or fire, which could trigger reignition of flames.
  4. Do NOT put butter, grease, dry dressings, ointments or salves on a burn; experts contend that they don’t cool the burn or relieve the pain, and some may leave behind a greasy residue that must be physically removed if the victim later requires medical attention. Instead, a one-step burn care product, such as Water-Jel First Aid Emergency Burn Dressing, is recommended. This first aid burn dressing from Water-Jel Technologies promptly relieves pain, protects the wound from further contamination, cools the burn and inhibits its progression, and helps promote healing.
  5. If burned on a clothed area, apply the Water-Jel Burn Dressing or Fire Blanket directly over the burned clothing. The gel will soak through the clothing to cool the burn, relieve the pain and allow easy removal of clothing prior to treatment by a medical professional. If Water-Jel dressings are not easily accessible, quickly remove all burned clothing, as it can continue to be a source of heat even after the fire has been extinguished.
  6. All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.
  7. If practical, elevate a burned extremity above the level of the heart while waiting for medical attention.

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What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of ELECTRICAL BURNS and recommendations regarding NFPA 70 ARC FLASH?

Electrical burns are caused by direct contact with electrical current or the passing of an electrical current through the body, including lightning.

  1. Before touching the victim, stop the source of the current, if possible, turn off the source of the power and deactivate the main circuit breaker.
  2. Use a nonconductive item, such as a wooden broom handle, rope, dry towel or wooden chair, to disengage the victim from the current source.
  3. Cool the burned area with a one-step burn care product, such as Water-Jel First Aid Emergency Burn Dressing. This first aid burn dressing from Water-Jel Technologies promptly relieves pain, protects the wound from further contamination, cools the burn, reduces its progression and helps promote healing.
  4. Seek prompt medical attention for all medical burns.

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What are the guidelines for emergency treatment of CHEMICAL BURNS?

Chemical burns are caused by direct bodily contact with acids, lye, strong detergents or chemicals, or by inhalation of chemical fumes. When a chemical burn occurs, seconds count!

  1. Immediately flush the affected areas with large quantities of water. Do not waste time looking for specific antidotes to the chemical that caused the burn and do not take time to remove the victim’s clothing until the flushing process is well underway.
  2. For a known acid burn, irrigate the area for at least 15 minutes; for a known lye burn, irrigate for one hour.
  3. Apply a one-step burn care product, such as Water-Jel First Aid Emergency Burn Dressing, to the burn wound. This first aid burn dressing from Water-Jel Technologies promptly relieves pain, protects the wound from further contamination, cools the burn and reduces its progression, and helps promote healing.
  4. Summon medical help.

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What shouldn’t I put on a burn?

Do NOT put butter, grease, dry dressings, ointments or salves on a burn; experts contend that they don’t cool the burn or relieve the pain, and some may leave behind a greasy residue that must be physically removed if the victim later requires medical attention. Instead, a one-step burn care product, such as Water-Jel First Aid Emergency Burn Dressing, is recommended. This first aid burn dressing from Water-Jel Technologies promptly relieves pain, protects the wound from further contamination, cools the burn and reduces its progression, and helps promote healing.

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Where do burn injuries occur?

Manufacturing Areas

Burns occur in areas where there are high heat, hot liquids, electricity and chemicals.

Small area or minor burns are commonly caused by welding sparks, hot liquid splashes, steam, hot tools, chemical splashes and small flames. These burn injuries occur frequently and can be treated quickly and effectively with Water-Jel Burn Jel, Cool Jel and small Water-Jel Burn Dressings.

Large area or serious burns occur in areas with risk of large spills, fire or explosion, high-temperature environments, hot metal, hot liquid, hot equipment, flame, steam, oil, gas and/or chemicals. These burns occur less frequently, but there is a severe threat of long-term effects or disability. Therefore, it is important to have Water-Jel Blankets, Face Masks, Burn Stations and Burn Dressings on hand to effectively care for these severe and potentially life-threatening injuries.

Construction Sites

Burns occur at construction sites in many of the same ways they occur at manufacturing facilities. Often, water supplies are limited and transportation time to a medical facility may be longer, so the availability of Water-Jel is even more critical. Therefore, it is important to have Water-Jel Portable Burn Kits that contain Fire Blankets and Burn Dressings, to treat burn injuries at the jobsite.

Kitchen Areas

Burns occur among the kitchen staff in the lunchroom or cafeteria. Small area or minor burns occur from ovens, grills, stoves, deep fryers and microwaves. So it is important to have a Water-Jel Household Burn Kit handy. Large area or serious burns occur from deep fryers, hot soup/liquid, gas ovens, gas stoves and gas grills. Here, it is important to have a Water-Jel Emergency Burn Station.

Lunchroom/Cafeteria

Burns occur in the lunchroom or cafeteria among employees and visitors, from microwaves, hot coffee and tea, and hot spills. A Water-Jel Small Burn Station should be mounted on the wall nearby.

Warehouse Areas

Burns occur from use of warehouse equipment, such as wrapping machines, heat-sealing machines, glue guns and packaging machines, as well as in the lunchroom. Here a Water-Jel Burn Kit is recommended.

Home

Burns that occur at home often need additional care than those that occur at the workplace. These burns occur from hot liquids, stoves, microwaves, irons, steam, hair curling irons and dryers, etc. So it is advisable to have Burn Jel Plus and a Water-Jel Two-dressing Pack on hand.

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How can I prevent burn injuries in my home?

Every 25 seconds, someone in the United States is burned or scalded in their home, according to the American Burn Association and the Burn Foundation.

Serious burns require immediate medical attention. But for minor burns, help can be as close as your kitchen first aid kit. EVERY kitchen should have Burn Jel Plus to treat minor burns.

The following tips will help keep your household safe all year long.

At Home:

  • Purchase a fire extinguisher and make sure all adults are knowledgeable about its proper use.
  • Have a Household Burn Kit handy with Water-Jel Burn Dressings to stop burn progressions, protect against infections and provide pain relief.
  • Have a first aid kit in your home to treat minor burns, scrapes and cuts.
  • Check smoke detectors regularly and replace old batteries. Utilize daylight saving time clock changes to remind you to check smoke detectors, batteries, fire extinguishers and your Water-Jel Burn Kit contents.
  • Review the floor plan of your home and prepare an exit route for every room.
  • Have practice fire drills regularly and educate children how to exit safely.
  • Choose a secure meeting spot outside to escape any emergency that may occur inside the home.

In the Kitchen:

  • Avoid wearing loose-fitting long-sleeved clothing when cooking.
  • Have good lighting in the kitchen and work areas.
  • Always keep pot handles turned inward, toward the back of the stove. Cook on rear burners whenever possible.
  • Keep a large lid within reach when frying to extinguish grease fires, if necessary.
  • Use large potholders or oven mitts.
  • Avoid leaving food to cook unattended.
  • Use a “fill-through-the-spout” teapot, the kind without a lid and with a whistle in the spout, to prevent “spilled water” scalds.
  • Avoid using area rugs in the kitchen, especially near the stove. They can cause falls and scalds.
  • Purchase appliances with short cords, and keep all cords from dangling over the edge of counters, as they can be pulled down. Cords may also become caught in cabinet doors, causing hot food and liquids to spill onto you or others. The grease in deep-fat fryers and cookers can reach temperatures higher than 400 degrees (F) and cause serious burns in less than one second.
  • Periodically check all handles on appliances and cooking utensils to ensure the handles are tightly fastened and will afford proper heat protection.
  • When removing lids from hot foods, remember that steam may have accumulated. Lift the cover or lid away from your face and arm.
  • Steam reaches temperatures greater than 200 degrees (F) when using a microwave, and builds rapidly in covered containers, which can result in burns to the face, arms and hands. Puncture plastic wrap or use vented containers to allow steam to escape while cooking. Or wait at least one minute before removing the cover. When removing covers, lift the corner farthest from you and away from your face or arm.

In the Dining Area:

  • During mealtime, place hot items in the center of the table, at least 10 inches away from the table edge.
  • Use non-slip placemats instead of tablecloths if toddlers are present. Young children may use the tablecloth to pull themselves up, causing hot food to spill down onto them. Tablecloths can also become entangled in crutches, walkers or wheelchairs, causing hot liquids to spill.

Especially for Children:

  • Keep children out of the kitchen when preparing hot meals.
  • If young children want to help with meal preparation, give them something cool to mix in a location away from the cooking. Do not allow a child to stand on a chair or sit on the counter next to the stove.
  • Place young children in highchairs or play yards a safe distance from countertops, stovetops, hot liquids, hot surfaces or other cooking hazards while preparing or serving food.
  • Cook on back burners when children are present.
  • Never hold a child while drinking a hot liquid.
  • Children should not be allowed to use cooking appliances until they are tall enough to reach cooking surfaces safely. As children get older and taller and assume more cooking responsibilities, teach them safe cooking practices.
  • Children under age 7 should not operate the microwave unless they are closely supervised. Instruct and supervise older children.
  • Keep children out of the “traffic path” and check for their location before moving any hot liquids in the kitchen.
  • Be sure to inform babysitters about kitchen and appliance safety and teach them to prevent burn injuries when preparing meals.

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How can I help keep my family safe from burns when grilling in the yard?

Adults, especially with young children, should be prepared to both prevent and treat accidental burns when grilling outdoors.

  • Follow manufacturers’ directions when using grills.
  • Use only commercial starting fluid to light charcoals. Never use gasoline or other flammable liquids.
  • Never add starter fluid to hot coals. They could catch fire and explode.
  • Thoroughly extinguish hot coals before disposal.
  • Supervise children at all times when grills are in use.
  • Establish a three-foot “keep away zone” for children around grills.
  • Do not wear loose-fitting clothing. Tie or pin up long hair.
  • As a safety precaution, always keep Burn Jel Plus nearby in case of an accident.

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What are the burn safety guidelines for camping with the family?

While you’re enjoying the great outdoors, toasting foods or gathering around the campfire, be prepared to both prevent and treat accidental burns.

  • When a fireplace is not available, build campfires in a cleared area.
  • Adult supervision is especially important when children toast foods over the fire.
  • Flaming marshmallows could ignite hair or clothing.
  • Keep a supply of water or an extinguisher within easy reach.
  • Store firewood at a safe distance.
  • Do not leave a burning campfire unattended.
  • Make sure coals are thoroughly extinguished before disposal.
  • As a safety precaution, always keep Burn Jel Plus nearby in case of an accident.

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How can I prevent burn damage from heated hairstyling appliances?

Mishaps from heated hairstyling appliances can cause painful burns. We recommend the following precautions.

  • Allot an appropriate amount of time to style hair. Burns are most likely to occur when you are in a hurry.
  • Read all instructions carefully, as some products heat faster and operate differently than others.
  • Understand how to properly use hairstyling tools and educate younger people on their correct usage, as well.
  • Always style your hair in bright light and with mirrors so you can see various angles.
  • Unplug products after use and allow them to cool on a burn-resistant counter before handling or storing.
  • Check the Internet for protective gloves that some appliance manufacturers offer to prevent burns on the hand that is holding the hair.
  • If a burn does occur, Burn Jel Plus can safely be applied to the neck, face or other skin surfaces.

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How can I prevent burn accidents when cooking with my children?

Cooking is the perfect solution to entertaining and educating restless kids of all ages over the holiday season. The key is to be prepared and emphasize all safety aspects.

It’s crucial to converse about the dangers of heat, as there are many risks associated with boiling liquids, scorching ovens, gas flames and hot food. Teach children that understanding these hazards will help prevent accidents. Always provide supervision. If multiple children are participating, more than one adult should be present.

Be organized and have a plan for kitchen activities, along with discussion to keep them focused on the task at hand. And be sure to provide kids safe opportunities for participation.

For burn safety guidelines for the kitchen, and especially for children, click here.

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